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Saya Anti-Rasuah

I was in the car with my friend and suddenly a police came over and gestured us to stop at the road side.

“Tadi lepas lampu merah. Saya hijau. Macam mana awak boleh jalan?” The Malay policeman said.

“Ya ka? Tadi saya nampak saya punya kuning saja. Kami urgent, jadi saya jalan,” my friend answered.

I saw the policeman had a “SAYA ANTI-RASUAH” white red badge.

“Macam mana? Macam mana? Bagi la, bagi lah,” he said.

“Aiya, encik boleh tolong ke?” my friend asked him.

“Bagi la, sekarang biznes tak baik. Bagi. Bagi. Sekarang biznes tak ok.”

“Bukan Anti-Rasuah ke?” I chided the police.

My friend elbowed me. I kept quiet.

I wanted to take his face and his badge name’s photo. He was asking for bribe when he’s a policeman! Hypocrite! But my friend wanted to give the bribe too, saying it would be more convenient and cheaper.

“Jadi saman la,” the police said. He wrote a lot of things into his notebook.

“Encik jadi kena bayar berapa?” my friend asked him.

“Awak tengok surat khabar la.”

WHAT? He didn’t know the rate?

I asked my friend again, “Just now I didn’t see the traffic light.. really yellow already?”

“Actually, yes.. red light already.”

I really hate government staff who are corrupted. But it is certainly easier and cheaper for my friend if the police accepted the bribe even after my ‘bad-mouth’. The police also happy – he gets pocket money if he accepts the bribe but he gets nothing from writing a saman except maybe good performance record. Maybe the government should introduce commission rate for traffic police haha.

Actually if there is no offender and no corruption, this wouldn’t happen. But our salaries (civilians & police) are not increasing as much as other living expenses like food, petrol, etc.

The police claimed the salary given by the government is not enough. What’s the true story? There are so many corrupted police (and equally corrupted civilians) – so why should they be given high salary? And how do the government/higher level determine which police is corrupted or not?

I felt really bad for my interference, I offered to my friend, “I pay half la.” I didn’t want my friend to be in trouble because it is her car and she was willing to pay for the bribe in the first place. Bad mouth!!! *cover mouth*

“No la!”

Someone advised me, “Sometimes you have to be practical. You can’t live in your ideal philosophy when the others are not like you. Somemore it’s not your car. You should’ve kept quiet.”

“I thought the police would stop giving saman and not take bribe after I said that… but yes, I should’ve shut up.”

“The police obviously didn’t have the same opinion.”

I felt like reporting or complaining this policeman’s behaviour to the government!

“But what if next time you are in trouble and you meet this policeman or his friend? You never know when they kena you. Maybe they kena you also you don’t know.”

I’m going to follow up with her on the penalty. Will definately pay half.. if she doesn’t accept it, then I’ll have to treat her to a big meal.

Check Saman here @ Rilek.

How to NOT pay bribe and get saman?

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8 thoughts on “Saya Anti-Rasuah

  1. Corruption can never be justified. If your friend was wrong, she should pay the full penalty and learn from her mistake. Be more careful whilst driving next time. However, if she did not beat the red light as claimed by the police, why pay the police for a blatant accusation? Take the summons and challenge it in court. The policeman will be more reluctant to have to attend court to be a witness (for having issued the summons) and he would probably have let your friend off if your friend had stood her ground. Trust me, policemen don’t like to waste time having to attend courts for hearings because they think they have better things to do.

    Yes, one person alone cannot fight the culture of corruption in this country but at least, you live with conscience that you are not perpetuating it.

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  2. My friend didn’t want more inconveniences – going to court would definately be 1 of that. I thought so too – if my friend had insisted that she was right, then we could have a better chance of getting off without saman & bribe. But I still feel so guilty for my bad mouth. Honest and straight, so what? I’m begining to get cynical..

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  3. Actually I’d just tough it out and see what the policeman does. Sometimes they buat buat write a lot of things but at the end they don’t issue the summons even if you don’t bribe. I found the “Tolong lah Encik… tak nampak la…. kasi chan la….” thing works esp if you are female ;) Try it next time and a bit of crocodile tears won’t go awry! :D Saya anti rasuah …

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  4. Sometimes if you insist on them giving the summons, they will eventually let you go.

    There are too few people like you , seriously

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  5. Paris Beaverbanks, my friend also did the same but stopped half way. Should bring eye drops next time!

    Blue, I think my friends would avoid me now.. Maybe I bring bad luck to them.

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  6. hi.
    i juz got involved in the same incident.except,after he took my money i drove straight into a police headquarters to report the bribe.
    at 1st the cops acted like they woud take action.(patted my back and say hey after i call the cop,he’ll return u ur money then u can go home.)i said i dont care if i dont get my money back i just wan action taken on such cheap cop.
    But ironically,when that cop came,he shove the money back to me n gave me a saman.he said i offered u that option but u took den when to report,ok ill giv u ur saman n ur licence will be cancelled.
    the cops who i reported to and the one who patted my back?
    they ran to hide.

    no justice at all…

    lame malaysia.

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  7. I had the same thing too.
    I couldn’t stop soon enough when the yellow light comes so sudden.
    Police stopped me and kinda asked for bribe too.
    And he had that badge too.

    It’s a shitty accident that may haunt me for weeks.
    Darn it.

    IT’S AN ACCIDENT! DAMN COP!

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